The Annual biography and obituary, Volume 1

Couverture
1817
 

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 463 - In forest, brake, or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude ; Men, who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain, Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain : These constitute a State, And sovereign Law, that State's collected will O'er thrones and globes elate, Sits Empress, crowning good, repressing ill.
Page 589 - To get over this, My Way is, to divide half a Sheet of Paper by a Line into two Columns; writing over the one Pro, and over the other Con. Then during three or four Days...
Page 590 - England a complete paradise, might have been obtained by spending those millions in doing good, which in the last war have been spent in doing mischief; in bringing misery into thousands of families, and destroying the lives of so many thousands of working people, who might have performed the useful labor!
Page 206 - That for the purpose of providing for the exercise of the Royal authority during the continuance of his Majesty's illness, in such manner, and to such extent, as the present circumstances and the urgent concerns of the nation appear to require, it is expedient that His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, being resident within the realm, shall be empowered to exercise and administer the Royal Authority, according to the laws...
Page 589 - Then during three or four days consideration, I put down under the different heads short hints of the different motives, that at different times occur to me, for or against the measure. When I have thus got them...
Page 603 - Chamberlaine, the founder i/f the " Society for the relief of Widows and Orphans of Medical men in London and its Vicinity.
Page 185 - October llth, 1715, he was rewarded for his active zeal by being appointed First Lord of the Treasury and Chancellor of the Exchequer, in.
Page 246 - Nothing but an earnest desire to spare the farther effusion of human blood could have induced them to read a paper, containing expressions so disrespectful to his Most Christian Majesty the good and great ally of these States, or to consider propositions so derogatory to the honour of an Independent Nation.
Page 163 - Under such circumstances did Mr. Hastings complete the treaty of Chunar — a treaty which might challenge all the treaties that ever subsisted, for containing in the smallest compass the most extensive treachery. Mr. Hastings did not...
Page 591 - Furnished as all Europe now is with academies of science, with nice instruments and the spirit of experiment, the progress of human knowledge will be rapid, and discoveries made, of which we have at present no conception. I begin to be almost sorry I was born so soon, since I cannot have the happiness of knowing what will be known one hundred years hence.

Informations bibliographiques