Modern Achievement, Volume 1

Couverture
P.F. Collier & son, 1900
 

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 275 - A good man out of the good treasure of the heart bringeth forth good things: and an evil man out of the evil treasure bringeth forth evil things.
Page 319 - WHEN I was sick and lay a-bed, I had two pillows at my head, And all my toys beside me lay To keep me happy all the day. And sometimes for an hour or so I watched my leaden soldiers go, With different uniforms and drills, Among the bed-clothes, through the hills. And sometimes sent my ships in fleets All up and down among the sheets; Or brought my trees and houses out, And planted cities all about.
Page xvi - She doeth little kindnesses Which most leave undone, or despise ; For naught that sets one heart at ease, And giveth happiness or peace, Is low-esteemed in her eyes.
Page 194 - Thy purpose firm, is equal to the deed : Who does the best his circumstance allows, Does well, acts nobly ; angels could no more.
Page 206 - For my own part, I used to think myself in company as much above me, when I was with Mr. Addison and Mr. Pope, as if I had been with all the Princes in Europe.
Page 208 - Wear your learning, like your watch, in a private pocket : and do not pull it out and strike it ; merely to show that you have one.
Page 212 - Talk often, but never long; in that case, if you do not please, at least you are sure not to tire your hearers. Pay your own reckoning, but do not treat the whole company ; this being one of the very few cases in which people do not care to be treated, every one being fully convinced that he has wherewithal to pay.
Page 169 - Turn not your back to others, especially in speaking; jog not the table or desk on which another reads or writes ; lean not on any one.
Page 171 - When another speaks, be attentive yourself, and disturb not the audience. If any hesitate in his words, help him not. nor prompt him without being desired; interrupt him not, nor answer him till his speech be ended.
Page 212 - Tell stories very seldom, and absolutely never but where they are very apt and very short. Omit every circumstance that is not material, and beware of digressions. To have frequent recourse to narrative betrays great want of imagination. Never hold anybody by the button or the hand, in order to be heard out ; for, if people are not willing to hear you, you had much better hold your tongue than them.

Informations bibliographiques