A Sketch of the History of India from 1858 to 1918

Couverture
Longmans, Green and Company, 1925 - 326 pages
 

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 224 - A time not very remote will arrive when England will, on sound principles of policy, wish to relinquish the domination which she has gradually and unintentionally assumed over this country, and from which she cannot at present recede.
Page 215 - I am convinced that the fundamental political mistake of able and experienced Indian officials is a belief that we can hold India securely by what they call good government ; that is to say, by improving the condition of the ryot, strictly administering justice, spending immense sums on irrigation works, &c.
Page 287 - Council in its Legislative as well as its Executive character should continue to be so constituted as to ensure its constant and uninterrupted power to fulfil the constitutional obligations that it owes and must always owe to His Majesty's Government and to the Imperial Parliament...
Page 231 - It is not primarily, with a view to improvement in administration that this measure is put forward and supported. It is chiefly desirable as an instrument of political and popular education.
Page 35 - ... of India to a very large extent by private correspondence between the Secretary of State and the Viceroy. He was disposed to neglect and, I also think, to underrate the value of the views of the Anglo-Indian officials. . . . This idea inevitably tended to bring the Viceroy into the same relation to the Secretary of State for India as that in which an Ambassador or Minister at a foreign Court stands to the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs.
Page 255 - A free press and the dominion of strangers are things which are quite incompatible, and which cannot long exist together. For what is the first duty of a free press ? It is to deliver the country from a foreign yoke, and to sacrifice to this one great object every...
Page 113 - My friend ! the relations of this Government are with the actual rulers of Afghanistan. If your Highness is able to consolidate your Highness's power in Cabul, and is sincerely desirous of being a friend and ally of the British Government, I shall be ready to accept your Highness as such...
Page 194 - We must at present do our best to form a class who may be interpreters between us and the millions whom we govern— a class of persons Indian in blood and colour, but English in tastes, in opinions, in morals and in intellect.
Page 29 - India and elsewhere, shall be subject to the control of the Secretary of State in Council, and no grant or appropriation of any part of...
Page 185 - I have, therefore, made it a rule to avoid as far as possible the issue of general instructions and have endeavoured to deal with questions as they arose with reference to existing treaties, the merits of each case, local conditions, antecedent circumstances and the particular stage of development, feudal and constitutional, of undivided principalities...

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