The City of the Sultan, And, Domestic Manners of the Turks in 1836, Volume 2

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Henry Colburn, 1837
 

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Page 453 - Hunting the hart in forest green, With bended bow and bloodhound free, For that's the life is meet for me. I hate to learn the ebb of time, From yon dull steeple's drowsy chime, Or mark it as the sunbeams crawl, Inch after inch, along the wall. The lark was wont...
Page 287 - But it revives — oh ! would it were my lot To be forgetful as I am forgot ! — Feel I not wroth with those who bade me dwell In this vast lazar-house of many woes? Where laughter is not mirth, nor thought the mind, Nor words a language, nor even men mankind...
Page 356 - It is impossible to express the contemptuous hatred in which the Osmanlis hold the Jewish people; and the veriest Turkish urchin who may encounter one of the fallen nation on his path, has his meed of insult to add to the degradation of the outcast and wandering race of Israel.
Page 293 - ... association connected with the idea of slavery, and an insurmountable disgust excited by the spectacle of money given in exchange for human beings ; but, beyond this, (and assuredly this is enough !) there is nothing either to distress or to disgust in the slavemarket of Constantinople. No wanton cruelty, no idle insult is permitted : the slaves, in many instances, select their own purchaser from among the bidders ; and they know that when once received into a Turkish family they become members...
Page 356 - Osmanlis (Turks) hold the Jewish people ; and the veriest Turkish urchin who may encounter one of the fallen nation on his path, has his mite of insult to add to the degradation of the outcast and wandering race of Israel.
Page 329 - A recent traveller in Turkey describes an interesting ceremony witnessed by her, performed at a time of excessive drought. " At dusk, the village children, walking two and two, and each carrying a bunch of wild flowers, drew near the cistern in their turn, and sang to one of the thrilling melodies of the country, a hymn of supplication.
Page 355 - Where they are considered rather as a link between animals and human beings, than as men possessed of the same attributes, warmed by the same sun, chilled by the same breeze, subject to the same feelings, and impulses, and joys, and sorrows, as their fellow mortals. There is a subdued and spiritless expression about the Eastern Jew, of which the comparatively tolerant European can picture to himself no possible idea until he has looked upon it. The Israelite of Europe has a peculiar physiognomy ;...
Page 331 - We seek the cooling fountain, Alas ! we seek in vain ; The cloud that crowns the mountain Melts not away in rain. The stream is shrunk which through our plain Once glided bright and clear ; Oh ! ope the secret springs again — Allah! Father! hear. We bring thee flowers, sweet flowers, All withered in their prime ; No moisture glistens on their leaves. They sickened ere their time. And we like them shall pass away Ere wintry days are near ; Shouldst thou not hearken as we pray — Allah! Father!...
Page 293 - ... they know that, when once received into a Turkish family, they become members of it in every sense of the word, and are almost universally sure to rise in the world if they conduct themselves worthily. The negroes only remain in the open court, where they are squatted in groups until summoned to show themselves to a purchaser, while the Circassians and Georgians, generally brought there by their parents at their own request, occupy the closed apartments, in order that they may not be exposed...
Page 391 - ... floor, combine to fling over the vast saloon an atmosphere of light and gladness, which is increased by the dazzling glories of the parterre spread out beneath the windows ; with its flashing fountain, golden orangery, and long line of gleaming lattices. The Reception-Room is small, and remarkable only for the comfortably-cushioned divan on which the Sultan receives his visitors ; and the noble view that it commands of the channel, from the Seraglio Point to the Castle of Mahomet. The Banquetting...

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