The Writings of George Washington: pt. I. Official letters relating to the French war, and private letters before the American revolution: March, 1754-May, 1775

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Harper & brothers, 1847
 

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Page 90 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Page 144 - The supplicating tears of the women, and moving petitions of the men, melt me into such deadly sorrow, that I solemnly declare, if I know my own mind, I could offer myself a willing sacrifice to the butchering enemy, provided that would contribute to the people's ease.
Page 403 - ... we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight ; I repeat it. sir, we must fight ! An appeal to arms, and to the God of Hosts, is all that is left us ! They tell us, sir, that we are weak, unable to cope with so formidable an adversary.
Page 443 - ... we were jammed in the ice, in such a manner, that we expected every moment our raft to sink, and ourselves to perish. I put out my setting pole to try to stop the raft...
Page 504 - If you speak of eloquence, Mr. Rutledge, of South Carolina, is by far the greatest orator ; but if you speak of solid information and sound judgment, Colonel Washington is unquestionably the greatest man on that floor.
Page 390 - For, sir, what is it we are contending against? Is it against paying the duty of three pence per pound on tea because burdensome? No, it is the right only that we have all along disputed...
Page 88 - I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although death was levelling my companions on every side...
Page 443 - Then, with gun in hand, and pack on my back, in which were my papers and provisions, I set out with Mr. Gist, fitted in the same manner, on Wednesday the 26th.
Page 460 - We caused them to abandon the lands belonging to the king.— We obliged them to leave their cannon, which consisted of nine pieces," etc. He further adds: " The English, struck with panic, took to flight, and left their flag and one of their colors.
Page 66 - of my continuing in the service and retaining my colonel's commission. This idea has filled me with surprise ; for if you think me capable of holding a commission that has neither rank nor emolument annexed to it, you must maintain a very contemptible opinion of my weakness, and believe me more empty than the commission itself.

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