The post and the paddock: with recollections of turf celebrities, by the Druid

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Page 82 - Ay ! mark his action well ! Behind he is, but what repose ! How steadily and clean he goes ! What latent speed his limbs disclose ! What power in every stride he shows ! They see, they feel, from man to man The shivering thrill of terror ran, And every soul instinctive knew It lay between the mighty...
Page 78 - When horses are in their great distress in running they cannot bear that visible manner of pulling as looked for by many of the sportsmen ; he should be enticed to ease himself an inch a time as his situation will allow.
Page 101 - Pavilion, and, gliding up the green ascent, was stationed close to the great stand, where it remained the centre of attraction for the day. At dinner-time, the Pavilion was resplendent with lights, and a sumptuous banquet was served to a large party...
Page 101 - ... box being replaced by Sir John Lade — issued out of the gates of the Pavilion, and, gliding up the green ascent, was stationed close to the Grand Stand, where it remained the centre of attraction for the day. At dinner-time the Pavilion was resplendent with lights, and a sumptuous banquet was...
Page 98 - Road," that the print still occupied, in his time, the post of honour over the Old Club chimney-piece at Melton, though a generation of sportsmen had passed away, and the room had been three times papered. With the remembrance of this stable scene fresh in his mind, it was no wonder that the Prince felt sure that Chifney would never play him false ; and that Chifney, more sorry for his royal master than himself, bore the temporary blasting of his riding hopes with such manly fortitude.
Page 219 - Derby ; but he is, perhaps, more disposed to back riders than horses, and is very liberal with them at times. Fordham is his favourite, and he very frequently declines to lay against the horse he is to ride. His constant habit has been to come to Tattersall's after the Derby, however great his losses, and pay on the Monday, instead of waiting till the conventional settling, Tuesday ; and while his lists were in force, he returned every night from Newmarket to attend to them, and provide the needful...
Page 59 - Whitsuntide week, than from any constitutional interest in race-horses. Before there was a railway from Liverpool to Aintree, the very mud-carts used to be pressed into the service for the day, and sixpence there and sixpence back was the tariff. A fiddler and twelve or thirteen mates, male and female, were squeezed into that narrow compass. On one occasion (1843), we were passing along the footpath, when a troop of these Bacchanals sturdily refused to alight at the entrance of Liverpool ; but in...
Page 100 - legs " and betters, who had arrived in shoals, used all to assemble on the Steyne at an early hour to commence their operations on the first day, and the buzz was tremendous, till Lord Foley and Mellish, the two great confederates of that day, would approach the ring, and then a sudden silence ensued, to await the opening of their betting books.
Page 75 - O yes ! O yes ! O yes ! who wants to buy a horse that can walk five miles an hour, trot eighteen, and gallop twenty ? ' Of course a crowd was round my lord in a moment, and on his repeating the flattering tale, there was no lack of aspirants to the possession of this remarkable animal ; but they were forced to content themselves with the assurance that 'When I see such a horse I will be sure to let you know.
Page 30 - Catton form two of the links in the stout " catenary chain" between Slane and Mercury ; Tramp stands half-way between Lanercost and Joe Andrews ; and King Fergus may be traced, through Beningboro', Orvile, and Emilius, to Priam, on the one side, and through Hambletonian, Whitelock, and Blacklock, to Voltaire, on the other. Of all his sons, however, Eclipse has most reason (as Dr. Marsham would say)

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