First Steps in English

Couverture
Silver, Burdett and Company, 1899 - 173 pages
 

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Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 168 - Days of plenty and years of peace; March of a strong land's swift increase...
Page 64 - THOU blossom bright with autumn dew, And colored with the heaven's own blue, That openest when the quiet light Succeeds the keen and frosty night. Thou comest not when violets lean O'er wandering brooks and springs unseen, Or columbines, in purple dressed, Nod o'er the ground-bird's hidden nest. Thou waitest late and com'st alone, When woods are bare and birds are flown, And frosts and shortening days portend The aged year is near his end.
Page 88 - WHICHEVER way the wind doth blow Some heart is glad to have it so ; Then blow it east or blow it west, The wind that blows, that wind is best.
Page 65 - Thou comest not when violets lean O'er wandering brooks and springs unseen, Or columbines, in purple dressed, Nod o'er the ground-bird's hidden nest. Thou waitest late and com'st alone, When woods are bare and birds are flown, And frosts and shortening days portend The aged year is near his end. Then doth thy sweet and quiet eye Look through its fringes to the sky, Blue — blue — as if that sky let fall A flower from its cerulean wall.
Page 48 - Without a sound of warning; When on the ground red apples lie In piles like jewels shining, And redder still on old stone walls Are leaves of woodbine twining...
Page 41 - A CHILD'S THOUGHT OF GOD. THEY say that God lives very high; But, if you look above the pines, You cannot see our God; and why ? And, if you dig down in the mines, You never see him in the gold ; Though from him all that's glory shines. God is so good he wears a fold Of heaven and earth across his face, Like secrets kept for love, untold. But still I feel that his embrace Slides down by thrills through all things made, — Through sight and sound of every place. As if my tender mother laid On my...
Page 46 - Thirty days hath September, April, June, and November ; All the rest have thirty-one, Except the second month alone, Which has but twenty-eight, in fine, Till leap year gives it twenty-nine.
Page 89 - s at the spring And day 's at the morn ; Morning 's at seven ; The hillside 's dew-pearled ; The lark 's on the wing ; The snail 's on the thorn : God 's in his heaven — All 's right with the world .
Page 47 - O suns and skies and clouds of June, And flowers of June together, Ye cannot rival for one hour October's bright blue weather...
Page 148 - It crossed the churchyard with a sigh, And said,

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