History of Rome, and of the Roman People, from Its Origin to the Invasion of the Barbarians, Volume 2,Partie 1

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C.F. Jewett Publishing Company, 1883
 

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Page 150 - Macedonia should be entered; where magazines should be formed; how provisions should be conveyed by land and sea; and when it is proper to engage the enemy, when to lie quiet. And they not only determine what is best to be done, but if...
Page 150 - But if he thinks this too much trouble, and prefers the repose of a city life to the toils of war, let him not, on land, assume the office of a pilot.
Page 279 - ... when in service, she had gone into that place of worship, as an attendant on her mistress ; but that, since she had obtained her liberty, she had never once gone near it : that she knew it to be the receptacle of all kinds of debaucheries ; that it was well known that, for two years past, no one older than twenty had been initiated there. When any person was introduced he was delivered as a victim to the priests, who led him away to a place resounding...
Page 283 - Another decree connected with this was then made, on a motion of the consul, Quintus Marcius, that "the business respecting the persons who had served the consuls as informers should be proposed to the senate...
Page 137 - Philip, for two years ; and in the third year, Titus Quintius Flamininus, in reward of my good conduct, gave me the command of the tenth company of spearmen. When Philip and the Macedonians were subdued, and we were brought back to Italy and discharged, I immediately went as a volunteer, with the consul Marcus Porcius into Spain.
Page 277 - ... having offered his oath ought to be deemed sufficient evidence that those books should, without delay, be burned in the comitium, and that the owner should be paid for them such price as might be judged reasonable by the praetor Quintus Petillius, and the majority of the plebeian tribunes.
Page 276 - ... during the space of six months, no rain fell. In the same year some workmen in the farm of Lucius Petillius, a notary, at the foot of the Janiculum, digging the ground deeper than usual, discovered two stone chests, about eight feet long and four broad, the covers of which were soldered with lead. Both the chests had inscriptions in Greek and Latin letters ; one signifying that therein was buried Numa Pompilius, son of Pompo, and king of the Romans ; the other that therein were contained the...
Page 282 - To the capital triumvirs the task was assigned to post watches in proper places of the city, and to use vigilance in preventing any meetings by night. In order likewise to guard against fires, five assistants were joined to the triumvirs, so that each might have the charge of the buildings in his own...
Page 255 - Tutores constituuntur tam masculis quam feminis ; sed masculis quidem impuberibus dumtaxat propter aetatis infirmitatem, feminis autem tam impuberibus quam puberibus, et propter sexus infirmitatem et propter forensium rerum ignorantiam.
Page 251 - ... surprised them; and we see ostentatious depravity quickly taking the place of a pure, though meagre, life. To quote again from Polybius, who himself was carried from Macedon to Rome as a prisoner of war: " Most of the Romans live in strange dissipation. The young allow themselves to be carried away by the most shameful excesses. They are given to shows, to feasts, to luxury and disorder of every kind, which it is too evident they have learned from the Greeks during the war with Perseus." Cato...

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