The Work of Lord Brougham for Education in England

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Franklin repository, 1922 - 127 pages
 

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Page 27 - Resolved, that an humble address be presented to His Royal Highness the Prince Regent, that he will be graciously pleased to give directions...
Page 31 - It unquestionably shows, that considerable unauthorized deviations have been made, in both Eton and Winchester, from the original plans of the founders ; that those deviations have been dictated more by a regard to the interests of the fellows than of the scholars, who were the main object of the foundations and of the founder's bounty...
Page 62 - ... explained in public lectures, though they may be learnt by reading far more easily than the physical sciences. In all plans of this description, it is absolutely necessary that the expenses should mainly be defrayed by those for whose benefit they are contrived. It is the province of the rich to lay the foundation, by making certain advances which are required in the first instance, and enabling the poor to come forward, both as learners and contributors. But no such scheme can either take a...
Page 63 - Happily the time is past and gone when bigots could persuade mankind that the lights of philosophy were to be extinguished as dangerous to religion; and when tyrants could proscribe the instructors of the people as enemies to their power.
Page 81 - ... 1. Whether the said schools are infant, daily, or Sunday schools. 2. Whether they are confined, either nominally or virtually, to the use of children of the Established Church, or of any other religious denomination. 3. Whether they are endowed or unendowed. 4. By what funds they are supported, if unendowed, whether by payments from the scholars or otherwise. 5. The number and sexes of the scholars in each school.
Page 33 - ... division, and the diversities of situation, upon which it is founded, furnishes a clue to guide us a great part of the way in our inquiries, if indeed it does not lead us to the conclusion. Now, in large towns, in those, I mean, where the population exceeds seven or eight thousand inhabitants, there exist, generally speaking, sufficiently ample means of instructing the poor ; not that there is almost any town where all can at present be taught, but that the laudable exertions of individuals are...
Page 114 - Our educators, are, after all, the best reformers, and are doing the best for their country, whether they intend so or not. In this respect, lord Brougham is the greatest man we have. He led popular education from the dark and narrow crib where he found it, like a young colt, saddled, and cruelly bitted by ignorance, for superstition to ride. He cut the straps from its sides, and the bridle from its jaws, and sent it forth, strong, beautiful, and free.
Page 35 - An act to amend an act of the last session of parliament for appointing commissioners to inquire concerning charities in England for the education of the poor ; and to extend the powers thereof to other charities in England and Wales...
Page 17 - ... that a very large number of poor children are wholly without the means of instruction, although their parents appear to be generally very desirous of obtaining that advantage for them.
Page 62 - ... great indeed, especially in the present deficiency of proper elementary works. The students are enabled to read with advantage ; things are explained to them which no books sufficiently illustrate; access is afforded to teachers, who can remove the difficulties which occur perpetually in the reading of uneducated persons ; a word may often suffice, to get rid of some obstacle which would have impeded the unassisted student's progress for days; and then, whatever requires the performance of experiments...

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