Woman Physiologically Considered as to Mind, Morals, Marriage, Matrimonial Slavery, Infidelity and Divorce

Couverture
A. H. Bailey, 1840 - 404 pages
 

Table des matières

I
1
II
49
III
92
IV
147
V
172
VI
239
VII
306

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Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 180 - Man's love is of man's life a thing apart, "Tis woman's whole existence; man may range The court, camp, church, the vessel, and the mart; Sword, gown, gain, glory, offer in exchange Pride, fame, ambition, to fill up his heart, And few there are whom these cannot estrange; Men have all these resources, we but one, To love again, and be again undone.
Page 386 - And I say unto you, Whosoever shall put away his wife, except it be for fornication, and shall marry another, committeth adultery: and whoso marrieth her which is put away doth commit adultery.
Page 276 - But some are ready to object that the disposition ought seriously to be considered before. But let them know again, that for all the wariness can be used, it may yet befall a discreet man to be mistaken in his choice: and we have plenty of examples.
Page 89 - She heard me thus, and, though divinely brought, Yet innocence and virgin modesty, Her virtue, and the conscience of her worth, That would be...
Page 252 - That indisposition, unfitness, or contrariety of mind, arising from a cause in nature unchangeable, hindering and ever likely to hinder the main benefits of conjugal society, which are solace and peace...
Page 101 - Love is inevitably consequent upon the perception of loveliness. Love withers under constraint : its very essence is liberty : it is compatible neither with obedience, jealousy, nor fear : it is there most pure, perfect, and unlimited, where its votaries live in confidence, equality, and unreserve.
Page 115 - It must not, however, be supposed, that these women are always easily won ; the greatest attentions and most fervent solicitations are sometimes requisite, even though there be no other lover in the way.
Page 103 - Constancy has nothing virtuous in itself, independently of the pleasure it confers, and partakes of the temporizing spirit of vice in proportion as it endures tamely moral defects of magnitude in the object of its indiscreet choice. Love is free; to promise for ever to love the same woman is not less absurd than to promise to believe the same creed; such a vow in both cases excludes us from all inquiry.
Page 102 - A husband and wife ought to continue so long united as they love each other ; any law which should bind them to cohabitation for one moment after the decay of their affection would be a most intolerable tyranny and the most unworthy of toleration.
Page 104 - How oft, when press'd to marriage, have I said, Curse on all laws but those which love has made! Love, free as air, at sight of human ties, Spreads his light wings, and in a moment flies...

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