The Olynthiac: And Other Public Orations of Demosthenes

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Harper & Brothers, 1857
 

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Page 120 - And we, the Greek community, seeing and hearing this, instead of sending embassies to one another about it and expressing indignation, are in such a miserable state, so intrenched in our separate towns, that to this day we can attempt nothing that interest or necessity requires; we cannot combine, or form any association for...
Page 60 - Athenians, will adopt this principle now, though you did not before, and every man, where he can and ought to give his service to the State, be ready to give it without excuse, the wealthy to contribute, the able-bodied to enlist, — in a word, plainly, if you will become your own masters, and cease each expecting to do nothing himself, while his neighbor does every thing for him, you shall then with heaven's permission recover your own, and get back what has been frittered away, and chastise Philip.
Page 57 - Would you but even now, renouncing these practices, perform military service and act worthily of yourselves; would you employ these domestic superfluities as a means to gain advantage abroad; perhaps, Athenians, perhaps you might gain some solid and important advantage, and be rid of these perquisites, which are like the diet ordered by physicians for the sick. As that neither imparts strength, nor suffers the patient to die, so your allowances are not enough to be of substantial benefit, nor yet...
Page 122 - ... principles have been sold as in open market, and those imported in exchange, by which Greece is ruined and diseased. What are they ? Envy where a man gets a bribe ; laughter if he confesses it; mercy to the convicted; hatred of those that denounce the crime; all the usual attendants upon corruption. For as to ships and men and revenues and abundance of other materials, all that may be reckoned as constituting national strength — assuredly the Greeks of our day are more fully and perfectly supplied...
Page 61 - Should anything befall this man, you will soon create another Philip, if you attend to business thus. For even he has been exalted not so much by his own strength as by our negligence. And again ; should anything happen to him; should fortune, which still takes better care of us than we of ourselves, be good enough to accomplish this; observe that, being on the spot, you would step in while things were in confusion, and manage them as you pleased ; but as you now are, though occasion offered Amphipolis,...
Page 45 - Impossible is it — impossible, Athenians — to acquire a solid power by injustice and perjury and falsehood. Such things last for once, or for a short period; maybe they blossom fairly with hope; but in time they are discovered and drop away. As a house, a ship, or the like, ought to have the lower parts firmest, so in human conduct, I ween, the principle and foundation should be just and true.
Page 55 - Athenians, what a summary contrast may be drawn between the doings in our olden time and in yours. It is a tale brief and familiar to all ; for the examples by which you may still be happy are found not abroad, men of Athens, but at home.
Page 115 - ... you by him. This it is that Philip purchases by all his expenditure, the privilege of assailing you without being assailed in turn. If we really wait until he avows that he is at war with us, we are the simplest of mortals: for he would not declare that, though he marched even against Attica and Piraeus, at least if we may judge from his conduct to others. For example, to the Olynthians he declared, when he was forty furlongs from their city, that there was no alternative, but either they must...
Page 80 - ... insensible progress and the rising up of a mighty power, against which we could have no defence, then our course of deliberation is not the same as formerly ; the orators, and you that hear them, must prefer good and salutary counsels to those which are easy and agreeable. First, men of Athens, if any one regards without uneasiness the might and dominion of Philip and imagines that it threatens no danger to the state, or that all his preparations are not against you, I marvel, and would entreat...
Page 118 - Lacedaemonians for twenty-nine; and the Thebans had some power in these latter times after the battle of Leuctra. Yet neither you, my countrymen, nor Thebans, nor Lacedaemonians, were ever licensed by the Greeks to act as you pleased: far otherwise. When you, or rather the Athenians of that time, appeared to be dealing harshly with certain people, all the rest, even such as had no complaint against Athens, thought proper to side with the injured parties in a war against her. So, when the Lacedaemonians...

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