The Ladies of Lovel-Leigh, Volume 1

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Hurst and Blackett, 1862 - 326 pages
 

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Page 228 - He reads much; He is a great observer and he looks Quite through the deeds of men; he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music; Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort As if he mock'd himself and scorn'd his spirit That could be moved to smile at any thing.
Page 129 - That place, that does Contain my books, the best companions, is To me a glorious court, where hourly I Converse with the old sages and philosophers ; And sometimes for variety I confer With kings and emperors, and weigh their counsels ; Calling their victories, if unjustly got, Unto a strict account ; and in my fancy, Deface their ill-placed statues.
Page 272 - Bestia's from the throne. Born to no pride, inheriting no strife, Nor marrying discord in a noble wife...
Page 272 - Unlearn'd, he knew no schoolman's subtle art, No language but the language of the heart. By nature honest, by experience wise, Healthy by temperance, and by exercise; His life, though long, to sickness past unknown, His death was instant, and without a groan.
Page 118 - Between two worlds life hovers like a star, 'Twixt night and morn, upon the horizon's verge. How little do we know that which we are ! How less what we may be ! The eternal surge Of time and tide rolls on, and bears afar Our bubbles ; as the old burst, new emerge, Lash'd from the foam of ages ; while the graves Of empires heave but like some passing waves.
Page 205 - Your face, my thane, is as a book, where men May read strange matters ; — To beguile the time, Look like the time ; bear welcome in your eye, Your hand, your tongue : look like the innocent flower, But be the serpent under it.
Page 41 - Who bears upon his baby brow the round And top of sovereignty." Look at me with thy large brown eyes, Philip my king, Round whom the enshadowing purple lies Of babyhood's royal dignities: Lay on my neck thy tiny hand With love's invisible sceptre laden; I am thine Esther to command Till thou shalt find a queen-handmaiden Philip my king.
Page 106 - The Old Man, noting this, resumed, and said, ' My Friend ! enough to sorrow you have given, The purposes of wisdom ask no more ; Be wise and cheerful ; and no longer read The forms of things with an unworthy eye. She sleeps in the calm earth, and peace is here.
Page 283 - For neither man nor angel can discern Hypocrisy, the only evil that walks Invisible, except to God alone, By his permissive will, through heaven and earth : And oft, though Wisdom wake, Suspicion sleeps At Wisdom's gate, and to Simplicity Resigns her charge, while Goodness thinks no ill Where no ill seems...

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