The History of the United States of America, Volume 6

Couverture
Harper, 1852
 

Table des matières

State Resolutions in its Favor
75
CHAPTER XXI
84
Boston Memorial Presidents Answer
89
Second Session of the Tenth Congress
95
State of the Revenue
106
Reception of the Enforcing Act
113
Alleged Federal Plot
119
Renewed Debate on the Embargo
125
Substitute for the Embargo
131
Territory of Illinois
138
The Cabinet Mission to Russia
150
Trial of Bright and his Militiamen
163
Erskine Arrangement
172
First Proceedings
178
Effects of that Disavowal
185
Breach with Jackson
193
Differences of Opinion as to the Policy to be adopted
197
Effects and History of the Nonimportation Act
203
Manufactures
209
Private Claims
212
Policy of Bonaparte
218
View taken of it by Wellesley
219
Proceedings in Relation to Florida
225
Revenue and Appropriations
231
Close of the Eleventh Congress
237
Termination of Pinkneys Mission
243
Barlows Mission to France
249
Treaty of Fort Wayne New Doctrine of the Prophet 353
255
Third Census and Apportionment
261
Continuation of the Debate
273
Ways and Means Gallatin
281
Politics of Massachusetts
287
Question of Breach of Privilege
294
Clinton nominated for the Presidency
299
Declaration of War
305
East Florida Proclamation to the Inhabitants of British
311
Influence of Foreigners Manufactures
317
Views of the Essex Junto
323
Reaction Political Revolution in Maryland Page
332
Fall of Michilimackinac Hulls Supplies intercepted
338
British Declaration respecting the Orders in Council
344
Character given by this Question to the War
352
Military Muster in Kentucky
359
First naval Events of the War
365
CHAPTER XXVI
378
Changes in the Cabinet
385
Occupation of Mobile Retaliations authorized
391
Navy Acts the Army
461
Pennsylvania and New Jersey
468
Restrictive System abandoned Protection to Manufactures
476
Failures at Prairie du Chien and Michilimackinac
482
Recruits for the Army
488
British War Party
492
Siege of Fort Erie Assault repulsed
498
Measures of Defense
504
The British in Washington
510
Battle of PlattsburgRetreat of the British
516
Defense of Fort Bowyer
522
Madisons Message Finances
525
Hartford Convention proposed
533
Jacksons March on Pensacola
539
State Elections
545
Its Acceptance Commissioners sent to Washington
553
Militia Martial Law Tennessee Volunteers
560
Battle of New Orleans Retreat of the British
564
Indian Auxiliaries 134
568
Financial and Commercial Enactments Commercial Con
570
New Arrangement of the Army Officers retained
577
Encouragement of Domestic Manufactures
583
Currency New National Bank
589
Nomination of Monroe for the Presidency
594
Politics of New Hampshire Dartmouth College
601
Bank of United States Crawford succeeds Dallas Finances
607
Territory of Alabama Domestic Slave Trade
613
Madisons Political Character
619
Other Appointments Monroes Visit to New England
622
Fifteenth Congress Calhoun and Clay
628
Clays Proposition to send a Minister to South America
635
Jacksons Seminole Campaign
641
Constitution of Connecticut
647
Monetary PressureNew Stoppage of the Western Banks
653
Relations with Great BritainConvention of 1818
659
Bill for erecting Missouri into a State Proposed Exclusion
661
Speech of Taylor
671
Attempted Bankrupt Law
677
Missouri Question at the North
683
Maine and Missouri in one Bill
689
Monroe hesitates to Sign the Bill
691
Perpetuity of Slavery Jefferson
697
Second Session of the Sixteenth Congress Speaker
703
Declaration of the Presidential Vote
709
AUTHORITIES
715
INDEX
721

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Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 563 - In adjusting the duties on imports to the object of revenue, the influence of the tariff on manufactures will necessarily present itself for consideration. However wise the theory may be, which leaves to the sagacity and interest of individuals the application of their industry and resources, there are in this, as in other cases, exceptions to the general rule.
Page 33 - debate," if such it can be called, while opposing a postponement for further information and reflection, he said, " The President has recommended the measure on his high responsibility ; I would not consider, I would not deliberate ; I would act. Doubtless the President possesses such further information as will justify the measure ! " * To my mind, that is the worst act of his public life ; I cannot justify it.
Page 44 - Were I to indulge my own theory, I should wish them to practise neither commerce nor navigation, but to stand with respect to Europe precisely on the footing of China. We should thus avoid wars, and all our citizens would be husbandmen.
Page 250 - ... professing to be republicans, to make good the promises held out by their republican predecessors, when they came into power; promises which, for years afterwards, they honestly, faithfully fulfilled.
Page 672 - ... regulations respecting the territory and other property of the United States.
Page 32 - I deem it my duty to recommend the subject to the consideration of Congress, who will doubtless perceive all the advantages which may be expected from an inhibition of the departure of our vessels from the ports of the United States.
Page 249 - I speak from facts, when I say, that the nightbell never tolls for fire in Richmond, that the mother does not hug her infant more closely to her bosom. I have been a witness of some of the alarms in the capital of Virginia.
Page 251 - Melimelli or the Little Turtle ; barbarians and savages of every clime and color, are welcome to our arms. With chiefs of banditti, negro or mulatto, we can treat and can trade. Name, however, but England, and all our antipathies are up in arms against her. Against whom ? Against those whose blood runs in our veins ; in common with whom, we claim...
Page 440 - Thither every indication of your fortune points you. There the united wishes and exertions of the nation will go with you. Even our party divisions, acrimonious as they are, cease at the water's edge.
Page 253 - ... what could you expect if they were the uncontrolled lords of the ocean? Had those privateers at Savannah borne British commissions, or had your shipments of cotton, tobacco, ashes, and what not, to London and Liverpool, been confiscated and the proceeds poured into the English exchequer, my life upon it you would never have listened to any miserable wire-drawn distinctions between "orders and decrees affecting our neutral rights...

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