Woman Physiologically Considered as to Mind, Morals, Marriage, Matrimonial Slavery, Infidelity and Divorce

Couverture
A. H. Bailey, 1840 - 404 pages
 

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 245 - Darkness before, and danger's voice behind, in an age in which he was as little understood by the party for whom, as by that against whom, he had contended, and among men before whom he strode so far as to dwarf himself by the distance; yet still listening to the music of his own thoughts ; or if additionally cheered yet cheered only by the prophetic faith of two or three solitary individuals, he did nevertheless argue not Against Heaven's hand or will, nor bate a jot Of heart or hope; but still...
Page 386 - And I say unto you, Whosoever shall put away his wife, except it be for fornication, and shall marry another, committeth adultery : and whoso marrieth her which is put away doth commit adultery.
Page 104 - How oft, when press'd to marriage, have I said, Curse on all laws but those which love has made! Love, free as air, at sight of human ties, Spreads his light wings, and in a moment flies...
Page 257 - ... where love cannot be, there can be left of wedlock nothing but the empty husk of an outside matrimony, as undelightful and unpleasing to God as any other kind of hypocrisy.
Page 276 - But some are ready to object that the disposition ought seriously to be considered before. But let them know again, that for all the wariness can be used, it may yet befall a discreet man to be mistaken in his choice: and we have plenty of examples.
Page 180 - Man's love is of man's life a thing apart ; 'Tis woman's whole existence...
Page 250 - He who marries, intends as little to conspire his own ruin, as he that swears allegiance : and as a whole people is in proportion to an ill government, so is one man to an ill marriage. If they, against any authority, covenant, or statute, may, by the sovereign edict of charity, save not only their lives but honest liberties from unworthy bondage, as well may he against any private covenant, which he never entered to his mischief, redeem himself from nnsupportable disturbances to honest peace and...
Page 252 - That indisposition, unfitness, or contrariety of mind, arising from a cause in nature unchangeable, hindering and ever likely to hinder the main benefits of conjugal society, which are solace and peace...
Page 89 - She heard me thus, and, though divinely brought, Yet innocence and virgin modesty, Her virtue, and the conscience of her worth, That would be woo'd, and not unsought be won...
Page 101 - Love is inevitably consequent upon the perception of loveliness. Love withers under constraint : its very essence is liberty : it is compatible neither with obedience, jealousy, nor fear : it is there most pure, perfect, and unlimited, where its votaries live in confidence, equality, and unreserve.

Informations bibliographiques