Rome in the Nineteenth Century: Containing a Complete Account of the Ruins of the Ancient City, the Remains of the Middle Ages, and the Monuments of Modern Times, Volume 3

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John Murray, 1826
 

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Page 431 - Midst the chief relics of almighty Rome; The trees which grew along the broken arches Waved dark in the blue midnight, and the stars Shone through the rents of ruin; from afar The watch-dog bayed beyond the Tiber: and, More near, from out the Caesars...
Page 39 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid, on a dolphin's back, Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song ; And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.
Page 131 - One of them wore a white crown, and another a crimson crown glittering with jewels. The mitres of the Bishops were also set with precious stones ; and their splendid dresses, and long wavy beards of silver whiteness, gave them a most venerable and imposing appearance. The procession issued forth...
Page 432 - twere anew, the gaps of centuries; Leaving that beautiful which still was so, And making that which was not, till the place Became religion, and the heart ran o'er With silent worship of the great of old, — 40 The dead, but sceptred sovereigns, who still rule Our spirits from their urns.
Page 140 - The thirteen priests were now seated in a row at the table, which was spread with a variety of dishes and adorned with a profusion of flowers. The pope gave the blessing, and walking along the side of the table opposite to them, handed each of them bread, then plates, and lastly, cups of wine. They regularly all rose up to receive what he presented ; and the pope having gone through the forms of service, and given them his parting benediction, left them to finish their dinner in peace. They carry...
Page 139 - They were all dressed in loose white gowns, with white caps on their heads, and clean woollen stockings, and were seated in a row along the wall, under a canopy. When the Pope entered and took...
Page 152 - At the unloosening of every nail they were renewed with fresh vehe-' mence, and the sobs and tears of the men were almost as copious as those of the women. Five prayers separately addressed to the five wounds of Christ — first the wound in the left foot — then that of the right foot, and so of the two hands, and, lastly, of the side, were next repeated. They were nearly the same, and all began, VI adoro, piaga Sanlissima. (I adore you most holy wound...
Page 131 - Pope had got out, the leaders of the procession had nearly got back again ; but they found the gates of the chapel closed against them, and on admittance being demanded, a voice was heard from within, in deep recitative, seemingly inquiring into their business, or claims for %ntrance there.
Page 347 - This beautiful temple," observes a recent traveller, " which stands on the very spot where the eye of taste would have placed it, and on which it ever reposes with delight, is one of the most attractive features of the scene, and perhaps gives to Tivoli its greatest charm."— ("Rome in the Nineteenth Century,
Page 152 - Sanlissima. (I adore you most holy wound.) The body of Christ being laid on a bier, decked with artificial flowers, and covered with a transparent veil, was brought down Mount Calvary by the holy men, as the Preacher called them, who deposited it on the front of the stage, where all the people thronged to kiss the toe through the veil, and weep over it. I was conducted round to it, along with...

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