Hansard's Parliamentary Debates

Couverture
T.C. Hansard, 1858
 

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Page 711 - Tis not the coarser tie of human laws, Unnatural oft, and foreign to the mind, That binds their peace ; but harmony itself, Attuning all their passions into love ; Where friendship...
Page 935 - Queen (to the amazement of that tiespot ic court) directed her secretary to inform him ' that she could inflict no punishment upon any the meanest of her subjects, unless warranted by the law of the land ; and therefore was persuaded that he would not insist upon impossibilities.
Page 127 - October, by the First Lord of the Treasury and the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The issue of that letter was, no doubt, an extraordinary exercise of power on the part of the Government ; but The House has decided that, in the peculiar circumstances of the period, they were justified in taking that step. It will be seen from the evidence of Mr. Cotton, the Governor of the Bank in 1844, that the possibility of circumstances arising, in which some extraordinary measures might be called for in consequence...
Page 353 - Ordered, That Mr. Speaker do issue his Warrant to the Clerk of the Crown, to make out a new Writ...
Page 829 - Afghanistan; and that the same be signified to them by the commanders of the several corps, who are desired to thank them for their gallant behaviour.
Page 725 - ... which it had severely suffered. The whole of the infantry were lying down in line, when, perceiving that the enemy had brought out the last reserved gun (a 24-pounder), and were rallying round it, 1 called up the regiment to rise and advance.
Page 935 - ... though her majesty could not inflict such a punishment as was required, because of the defect in that particular of the former established constitutions of her kingdom, yet, with the unanimous consent of the parliament, she had caused a new act to be passed, to serve as a law for the future.
Page 1033 - Stirling and my aide-de-camp, who had placed himself in their front, were not to be denied. Their rear showed the ground strewed with wounded ; but on they steadily and silently came, then with a cheer charged, and captured the unwieldy trophy of their valour.
Page 935 - But the queen (to the amazement of that despotic court) directed her secretary to inform him, "that she could inflict no punishment upon any, the meanest, of her subjects, unless warranted by the law of the land; and therefore was persuaded that he would not insist upon impossibilities.

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