Annual report of the Governors of the Almshouse, New York. v. 5, 1853, Volume 5

Couverture
Governors of the Almshouse, 1849-19uu., 1854
 

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Page 44 - Leave thy fatherless children, I will preserve them alive; and let thy widows trust in me.
Page 58 - One fatal remembrance — one sorrow that throws Its bleak shade alike o'er our joys and our woes To which Life nothing darker nor brighter can bring, For which joy hath no balm — and affliction no sting.
Page 76 - Besides being a well educated physician, he should possess the mental, physical, and social qualities to fit him for the post. He should serve during good behavior, reside on or very near the premises, and his compensation should be so liberal as to enable him to devote his whole time and energies to the welfare of the Hospital. He should nominate to the Board suitable persons to act as Assistant physician, Steward, and Matron. He should have...
Page 72 - All such buildings should be .constructed of stone or brick, have slate or metallic roofs, and, as far as possible, be made secure from accidents by fire. VII. Every hospital having provision for two hundred or more patients should have in it at least eight distinct wards for each sex — making sixteen classes in the entire establishment. VIII. Each ward should -have in it a parlor, a corridor, single lodging rooms for patients, an associated -dormitory, communicating with a chamber for two attendants,...
Page 72 - V. The highest number that can with propriety be treated in one building is two hundred and fifty, while two hundred is a preferable maximum. VI. All such buildings should be constructed of stone or brick, have slate or metallic roofs, and, as far as possible, be made secure from, accidents by fire. VII. Every hospital, having provision for two hundred or more patients, should have in it at least eight distinct wards for each sex, making sixteen classes in the entire establishment.
Page 73 - The wings should be so arranged, that if rooms are placed on both sides of a corridor ; the corridors should be furnished at both ends with movable glased sashes, for the free admission of both light and air.
Page 71 - No hospital for the insane, however limited its capacity should have less than fifty acres of land, devoted to gardens and pleasure grounds for its patients. At least one hundred acres should be possessed by every State hospital, or other institution for two hundred patients, to which number these propositions apply, unless otherwise mentioned.
Page 73 - The stairways should always be of iron, stone, or other indestructible material, ample in size and number, and easy of ascent, to afford convenient egress in case of accident from fire.
Page 73 - The apartments for washing, clothing, &c., should be detached from the Hospital building. XIX. The drainage should be under ground, and all the inlets to the sewers should be properly secured to prevent offensive emanations.
Page 77 - In no institution should the number of persons in immediate attendance on the patients be in a lower ratio than one attendant for every ten patients; and a much larger proportion of attendants will commonly be desirable.

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