A View of the Ancient and Present State of the Zetland Islands: Including Their Civil, Political, and Natural History; Antiquities; and an Account of Their Agriculture, Fisheries, Commerce, and the State of Society and Manners, Volume 1

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J. Ballantyne and Company, 1809 - 364 pages
 

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Page 221 - Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, Where wealth accumulates, and men decay : Princes and lords may flourish, or may fade ; A breath can make them as a breath has made ; But a bold peasantry, their country's pride, When once destroyed, can never be supplied.
Page 12 - The nights begin to be very short early in May, and from the middle of that month to the end of July, darkness is absolutely unknown. The sun scarcely quits the horizon, and his short absence is supplied by a bright twilight. Nothing can surpass the calm serenity of a fine summer night in the Zetland isles. The atmosphere is clear and unclouded, and the eye has an uncontrolled and extensive range : — the hills and...
Page 262 - Besides 1500 sail of herring busses and 20 wafters, " there were also," he adds, " a small fleet of dogger-boats, which were of the burden of 60 tun and upward, which did fish only with hooks and lines for ling and cod.
Page 271 - An Act for the further encouragement and better Regulation of the British "White Herring Fishery until the First day of June One thousand eight hundred and thirteen, and from thence to the end of the then next Session of Parliament.
Page 171 - ... inches long, introduced, which at the other end holds the sock and sky. The furrow is made deep or shallow, by driving a wedge below or above the mercal, on the outside of the beam. There is a stilt on the top of the plough ; and the man who holds it walks on the white land at the side of it.
Page 196 - Potatoe to produce seeds to be the preternaturally early formation of the tuberous root ; which draws off for its support that portion of the sap which, in other plants of the same species, affords nutriment to the blossoms and seeds : and experiment soon satisfied me that my conjectures were perfectly well founded.
Page 344 - Duke with 200 men came to shore alive and wintered here in great miseric, for the Spaniards at first eating up all they could find, not only neat, sheep, fishes, and fowls, but also horses, the Islanders in the night carried off their beasts and...
Page 12 - ... more majestic, and they have a solemnity superadded to their grandeur : — the water in the bays appears dark, and as smooth as glass : — no living object interrupts the tranquillity of the scene...
Page 341 - Tullibardin, and Adam Bothwell, bishop of Orkney. But the Earl (Bothwell) was fled from Orkney to Sheatland, whither also they followed him, and came in sight of Bothwell's ship, which moved the laird of Grange to cause the skippers to hoise up all the sails, which they were loath to do, because they knew the shallow water thereabout.
Page 12 - Nothing can surpass the calm serenity of a fine summer night in the Shetland Isles, the atmosphere is clear and unclouded, and the eye has an uncontrolled and extreme range; the hills and the headlands look more majestic, and they have a solemnity superadded to their grandeur; the water in the bays appears dark, and as smooth as glass ; no living object interrupts the tranquillity of the scene, unless a solitary gull skimming the surface of the sea ; and there is nothing to be heard but the distant...

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