The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 2

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Little, Brown, 1854 - 366 pages
 

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Page 26 - O may I pant for thee in each desire ! / And with strong faith foment the holy fire ! Stretch out my soul in hope, and grasp the prize. Which in eternity's deep bosom lies ! At the great day of recompense behold, Devoid of fear, the fatal book unfold ! Then wafled upward to the blissful seat, From age to age my grateful song repeat; My Light, my Life, my God, my Saviour see, And rival angels in the praise of thee !—YOUNG.
Page 83 - I'm nearer death in this verse than the last : What then is to be done ? be wise with speed : A fool at forty is a fool indeed.
Page 107 - With legs toss'd high, on her sophee she sits, Vouchsafing audience to contending wits : Of each performance she's the final test ; One act read o'er, she prophesies the rest ; And then, pronouncing with decisive air, Fully convinces all the .Town — she's fair. Had lovely Daphne Hecatessa's face, How would her elegance of taste decrease ! Some ladies' judgment in their features lies, And all their genius sparkles from their eyes.
Page 195 - It what bright glories run From plume to plume, and vary in the sun ! He proudly spreads them to the golden ray, Gives all his colours, and adorns the day ; With conscious state the spacious round displays, And slowly moves amid the waving blaze. Who taught the hawk to find, in seasons wise. Perpetual summer, and a change of skies ? When clouds deform the year, she mounts the wind, Shoots to the south, nor fears the storm behind ; The sun returning, she returns again, Lives in his beams, and leaves...
Page 145 - One to destroy, is murder by the law ; And gibbets keep the lifted hand in awe ; To murder thousands, takes a specious name, War's glorious art, and gives immortal fame.
Page 103 - As unresery'd, and beauteous, as the sun, ^> '•' Through every sign of vanity they run ; Assemblies, parks, coarse feasts in city-halls, Lectures, and trials, plays, committees, balls, Wells, bedlams, executions, Smithfield scenes, And fortune-tellers
Page 18 - Csesar unnoted in your presence stands. How vast the concourse ! not in number more The waves that break on the resounding shore, The leaves that tremble in the shady grove, The lamps that gild the spangled vaults above : Those overwhelming armies, whose command Said to one empire, fall ; another, stand : Whose rear lay wrapt in night, while breaking dawn Rous'd the broad front, and call'd the battle on : Great Xerxes...
Page 28 - Flung back in time an hour, a moment's space, To grasp with eagerness the means of grace, Contend for mercy with a pious rage, And in that moment to redeem an age ! Drive back the tide, suspend a storm in air, Arrest the Sun ; but still of this despair.
Page 195 - How rich the Peacock ! £ what bright glories run From plume to plume, and vary in the sun ! He proudly spreads them, to the golden ray Gives all his colours, and adorns the day ; With conscious state the spacious round displays, And slowly moves amid the waving blaze.
Page 119 - Tis greatly wise to know, before we're told, The melancholy news, that we grow old. Autumnal LYCE carries in her face Memento mori to each public place. O how your beating breast a mistress warms, Who looks through spectacles to see your charms ! While rival undertakers hover round, And with...

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