Outlines of English History: From the Roman Conquest to the Present Time : with Observations on the Progress of Art, Science, and Civilization, and Questions Adapted to Each Paragraph : for the Use of Schools

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Brewer and Tileston, 1857 - 110 pages
 

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Page 84 - That the late act of parliament, entitled, an act for granting and applying certain stamp duties, and other duties in the British colonies and plantations in America, etc., by imposing taxes on the inhabitants of these colonies, and the said act, and several other acts, by extending the jurisdiction of the courts of admiralty beyond its ancient limits, have a manifest tendency to subvert the rights and liberties of the colonists.
Page 83 - That it is inseparably essential to the freedom of a people, and the undoubted right of Englishmen, that no taxes be imposed on them, but with their own consent, given personally, or by their representatives. IV. That the people of these colonies are not, and from their local circumstances, cannot be represented in the house of commons in Great Britain.
Page 84 - ... to both houses of parliament, to procure the repeal of the act for granting and applying certain stamp duties, of all clauses of any other acts of parliament, whereby the jurisdiction of the admiralty is extended as aforesaid, and of the other late acts for the restriction of American commerce.
Page 83 - That his Majesty's subjects in these colonies, owe the same allegiance to the crown of Great Britain, that is owing from his subjects born within the realm, and all due subordination to that august body the parliament of Great-Britain.
Page 83 - Crown being free gifts of the people, it is unreasonable and inconsistent with the principles and spirit of the British Constitution, for the people of Great Britain to grant to his Majesty the property of the Colonists. " VII. That trial by jury is the inherent and invaluable right of every British Subject in these Colonies.
Page 84 - That the increase, prosperity and happiness of these colonies depend on the full and free enjoyment of their rights and liberties, and an intercourse with Great Britain mutually affectionate and advantageous.
Page 84 - Parliament, from the peculiar circumstances of these colonies, will be extremely burthensome and grievous; and from the scarcity of specie, the payment of them absolutely impracticable. X. That as the profits of the trade of these colonies ultimately center in Great-Britain, to pay for the manufactures which they are obliged to take from thence, they eventually contribute very largely to all supplies granted there to the Crown. XI. That the restrictions imposed by several late Acts of Parliament,...
Page 83 - That all supplies to the Crown being free gifts of the people, it is unreasonable and inconsistent with the principles and spirit of the British Constitution, for the people of Great Britain to grant to His Majesty the property of the colonists.
Page 83 - ... respecting the most essential rights and liberties of the colonists, and of the grievances under which they labour, by reason of several late Acts of Parliament.
Page 72 - but so much the worse for them !" 4. It was in this posture of affairs that all people turned their eyes upon William prince of Orange, who had married Mary, the eldest daughter of king James.

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