The City of the Sultan, And, Domestic Manners of the Turks in 1836, Volume 1

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Henry Colburn, 1837
 

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Page 461 - Hunting the hart in forest green, With bended bow and bloodhound free, For that's the life is meet for me. I hate to learn the ebb of time, From yon dull steeple's drowsy chime, Or mark it as the sunbeams crawl, Inch after inch, along the wall. The lark was wont...
Page 299 - There is always a painful association connected with the idea of slavery, and an insurmountable disgust excited by the spectacle of money given in exchange for human beings ; but, beyond this, (and assuredly this is enough !) there is nothing either to distress or to disgust in the slavemarket of Constantinople. No wanton cruelty, no idle insult is permitted : the slaves, in many instances, select their own purchaser from among the bidders ; and they know that when once received into a Turkish family...
Page 199 - Turk, and to place it almost on a level with paganism : but surely this is ao error unworthy of the nineteenth century, and of the liberality of Englishmen. The practice of a religion which enforces the necessity of prayer and charity — which is tolerant of all opposing modes of worship — and which enjoins universal brotherhood, can scarcely be contemptible. And while the Christian, enlightened on the great truths that are hidden from the Mahomeddan, is compelled to pity the darkness of a faith...
Page 300 - ... and are almost universally sure to rise in the world if they conduct themselves worthily. The negroes only remain in the open court, where they are squatted in groups until summoned to show themselves to a purchaser, while the Circassians and Georgians, generally brought there by their parents at their own request, occupy the closed apartments, in order that they may not be exposed to the gaze of the idlers who throng the court. The utmost order, decency, and quiet prevail ; and a military guard...
Page 361 - Where they are considered rather as a link between animals and human beings, than as men possessed of the same attributes, warmed by the same sun, chilled by the same breeze, subject to the same feelings, and impulses, and joys, and sorrows, as their fellow mortals. There is a subdued and spiritless expression about the Eastern Jew, of which the comparatively tolerant European can picture to himself no possible idea until he has looked upon it. The Israelite of Europe has a peculiar physiognomy ;...
Page 351 - ... thence passes into the hands of the spinners, where it is worked into threads of greater or less size, according to the quality of fez for which it is to be made available. The women then receive it in balls, each containing the quantity necessary for a cap ; and these they take home by half a dozen or a dozen at a time, to their own houses, and on restoring them receive a shilling for each of the coarse ; and seventeen pence for each of the fine ones. The next process is the most inconvenient,...
Page 363 - Osmanlis hold the Jewish people; and the veriest Turkish urchin who may encounter one of the fallen nation on his path, has his meed of insult to add to the degradation of the outcast and wandering race of Israel. Nor dare the oppressed party revenge himself even upon this puny enemy, whom his very name suffices to raise up against him.
Page 247 - ... the sunburnt Greek, with his large, flapping hat of Leghorn straw, and Frank costume, hurrying along from group to group with his pails of ice ; and recommending his delicate and perishable luxury in as many languages as he is likely to earn piastres — the never-failing water-carrier, with his large turban, his graceful jar of red earth, and his crystal goblet — the negroes of the higher harems, laden with carpets, chibouks, and refreshments for their mistresses — the fruit-venders...
Page 397 - ... woods, arabesqued ceiling, and numerous casements, open no less than eight spacious saloons, appropriated to the Imperial Household. Above this suite are situated the State Apartments ; gorgeous with gilding, and richly furnished with every luxury peculiar alike to the East and to the West. The Turkish divans of brocade and embroidered velvet are relieved by sofas and lounges of European fashion — bijouterie from Geneva — porcelain from Sevres — marbles from Italy — gems from Pompeii...

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