Glimpses of the French Court: Sketches from French History

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Estes and Lauriat, 1893 - 203 pages
 

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Page 10 - TELL me now in what hidden way is Lady Flora the lovely Roman ? Where's Hipparchia, and where is Thais, Neither of them the fairer woman? Where is Echo, beheld of no man, Only heard on river and mere, — She whose beauty was more than human? But where are the snows of yester-year?
Page 11 - I ween, Lost manhood and put priesthood on ? (From Love he won such dule and teen !) And where, I pray you, is the Queen Who willed that Buridan should steer Sewed in a sack's mouth down the Seine ? . . . But where are the snows of yester-year ? White Queen Blanche, like a queen of lilies, With a voice like any mermaiden, — Bertha Broadfoot, Beatrice, Alice, And Ermengarde the lady of Maine, — And that good Joan whom Englishmen At Rouen doomed and burned her there, — Mother of God, where are...
Page 190 - That man of loneliness and mystery Scarce seen to smile, and seldom heard to sigh; Whose name appals the fiercest of his crew, And tints each swarthy cheek with sallower hue; Still sways their souls with that commanding art That dazzles, leads, yet chills the vulgar heart. What is that spell, that thus his lawless train Confess and envy, yet oppose in vain?
Page 89 - He often gave it to me, rarely to ambassadors, except to the Nuncio, and in later times to the Spanish ambassador. " You took off your glove : you came forward : you held the candle during the coucher, which was very short ; you then gave it back to the first valet-de-chambre, who, if he chose, gave it to some one of the petit coucher. " I had purposely kept back ; and I was much surprised, as were the bystanders, to hear myself named ; and on future occasions I had it almost as often as before....
Page 88 - I am about to narrate if it did not help to characterize him under the circumstances. Although the place where he undressed was well lighted, the almoner of the day, who held a lighted candle at his evening prayer, gave it back afterwards to the first valet-de-chambre, who carried it before the king as he resumed his seat. He glanced round, and named aloud one of those present, to whom the valet gave the candle. It was a distinction and a favour which had its value ; so adroit was the king in making...
Page 14 - matter without offence to sing. But no songs please you that are not of Love. Certes, they are of nothing else but Love ; Love itself by Supreme Wisdom was their composer, and vain man was the transcriber only. That Love gave you language and voices for your notes of praise. It is a love that will not torment your hearts, but fill your whole souls with the pleasure angels share. For His Spirit will come into your hearts, and stir your lips, and 'guide your fingers on the spinet towards holy strains....
Page 17 - Assault that lying Greece, and plant there once again the famous nation of the Gallo-Greeks. Pillage without scruple the sacred treasures of that Delphic temple, as you have done aforetime ; and fear no more that dumb Apollo, his false oracles or his blunted arrows.
Page 88 - ... who held a lighted candle at his evening prayer, gave it back afterwards to the first valet-de-chambre, who carried it before the King as he resumed his seat. He glanced round, and named aloud one of those present, to whom the valet gave the candle. It was a distinction and a favour which had its value ; so adroit was the King in making something out of nothings. He only gave it to those who were most distinguished by dignity and birth, very rarely to inferiors in whom age and services sufficed....
Page 90 - ... refusal on their part; and the result was that the collection became irregular and bade fair to be discontinued altogether. On hearing this, the King vowed that rather than the custom should be given up, the purse should be carried round by the Duchess of Burgundy; and that as for Saint-Simon, ' he had done nothing since he quitted the service but study degrees of rank and get into squabbles with everybody ; that he was the originator of all this ; and that if he had his deserts, he would be...
Page 15 - The Queen's favourite was, Ne vueilles pas, o sire, Me reprendre en ton ire, that is, " Rebuke me not in thy indignation," which she sung to a fashionable jig. Antony, king of Navarre, sung, Revenge may prem la querelle, or, " Stand up, O Lord, to revenge my quarrel," to the air of a dance of Poitou*.

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