Disraeli and His Day

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K. Paul, Trench, Trübner, 1891 - 500 pages
 

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Page 227 - Lordships — which was unnecessary, but there are many whom it may be needful to remind — that an advocate, by the sacred duty which he owes his client, knows, in the discharge of that office, but one person in the world, THAT CLIENT AND NONE OTHER. To save that client by all expedient means— to protect that client at all hazards and costs to all others, and among others to himself — is the highest and most unquestioned of his duties...
Page 355 - In the year of the great crime, When the false English nobles and their Jew By God demented, slew The Trust they stood twice pledged to keep from wrong, One said, Take up thy Song That breathes the mild and almost mythic time Of England's prime!
Page 467 - It was not in the battle; No tempest gave the shock ; She sprang no fatal leak, She ran upon no rock.
Page 228 - ... an advocate by the sacred duty which he owes his Client, knows in the discharge of that office but one person in the world, that Client and none other. To save that Client by all expedient means, to protect that Client at all hazards and costs to all others, and among others to himself, is the highest and most unquestioned of his duties; and he must not regard the alarm, the suffering, the torment, the destruction which he may bring upon any other.
Page 136 - ... satin, reading by a magnificent lamp suspended from the centre of the arched ceiling ; sofas, couches, ottomans, and busts arranged in rather a crowded sumptuousness through the room ; enamel tables, covered with expensive and elegant trifles, in every corner ; and a delicate white hand relieved on the back of a book, to which the eye was attracted by the blaze of its diamond rings.
Page 147 - Isles, that crown th' ^Egean deep, Fields, that cool Ilissus laves, Or where Maeander's amber waves In lingering lab'rinths creep, How do your tuneful echoes languish, Mute, but to the voice of anguish ! Where each old poetic mountain Inspiration...
Page 147 - The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power, And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave, Await alike the inevitable hour: The paths of glory lead but to the grave.
Page 228 - To save that client by all expedient means, — to protect that client at all hazards and costs to all others, and among others to himself, — is the highest and most unquestioned of his duties ; and he must not regard the alarm — the suffering — the torment — the destruction — which he may bring upon any other. Nay, separating even the duties of a patriot from those of an advocate, and casting them, if need be, to the wind, he must go on reckless of the consequences, if his fate it should...
Page 335 - O'Connell avows his wish to be no longer a member. I expect to be a representative of the people before the repeal of the Union. We shall meet at Philippi; and rest assured that, confident in a good cause, and in some energies which have been not altogether...
Page 225 - I conclude that it was, on his side, but the blustering artifice of a rhetorical hireling, availing himself of the vile license of a loose-tongued lawyer, not only to make a statement which was false, but to make it with a consciousness of its falsehood.4 I am, Sir[,] your obedient faithful servant, I B.

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