Speeches of the Late Right Honourable Richard Brinsley Sheridan: (Several Corrected by Himself)

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Page 126 - Justice I have now before me august and pure ! The abstract idea of all that would be perfect in the spirits and the aspirings of men...
Page 117 - It needs not the deductions of reason. Pre-existing, paramount over all, whether moral law or human rule, few arguments can increase, and none can diminish it. It is the sacrament of our nature ; not only the duty, but the indulgence of man. It is his first great privilege. It is among his last most endearing delights.
Page 116 - It goes to show that some, at least, of the persons concerned in these transactions felt the force of those ties which their efforts were directed to tear asunder ; that those who could ridicule the respective attachment of a mother and a son; who...
Page 18 - Sheridan now moved that there be laid before the house,
Page 115 - English ; that, when stung to madness, she asked " how long would be her reign," there was no mention of her disaffection. The stress is therefore idle, which the counsel for the prisoner have strove to lay on these expressions of an injured and enraged woman.
Page 111 - Taint not thy mind, nor let thy soul contrive Against thy mother aught; leave her to heaven, And to those thorns that in her bosom lodge To prick and sting her.
Page 126 - No, my lords, justice is not this halt and miserable object; it is not the ineffective bauble of an Indian pagod; it is not the portentous phantom of despair; it is not like any fabled monster, formed in the eclipse of reason, and found in some unhallowed grove of superstitious darkness and political dismay!
Page 121 - I conjure you, by your sacred names, to depart for a moment from this place, though it be your peculiar residence; nor hear your names profaned by such a sacrilegious combination as that which I am now compelled to repeat ! — where all the fair forms of nature and art, truth and peace, policy and honour...
Page 126 - I conjure by those rights it is your best privilege to preserve ; by that fame it is your best pleasure to inherit ; by all those feelings which refer to the first term in the series of existence, the original compact of our nature — our controlling rank in the creation. This is the call on all to administer to truth and equity, as they would satisfy the laws and satisfy themselves with the most exalted bliss possible or...
Page 119 - ... acts of Mr. Hastings and Mr. Middleton were such as a Christian ought to perform...

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