History of Rome and the Roman People: From Its Origin to the Establishment of the Christian Empire, Volume 2,Numéro 1

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Estes & Lauriat, 1884
 

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Page 314 - ... of those of the men; and that not only of men in private stations, but of the magistrates: and that the state was endangered by two opposite vices, luxury and avarice; those pests, which have been the ruin of all great empires.
Page 93 - ... should be entered ; where magazines should be formed ; how provisions should be conveyed by land and sea ; and when it is proper to engage the enemy, when to lie quiet. And they not only determine what is best to be done, but, if...
Page 94 - But if he thinks this too much trouble, and prefers the repose of a city life to the toils of war, let him not, on land, assume the office of a pilot.
Page 313 - If, Romans, every individual among us had made it a rule to maintain the prerogative and authority of a husband with respect to his own wife, we should have less trouble with the whole sex.
Page 219 - ... when in service, she had gone into that place of worship, as an attendant on her mistress ; but that, since she had obtained her liberty, she had never once gone near it : that she knew it to be the receptacle of all kinds of debaucheries ; that it was well known that, for two years past, no one older than twenty had been initiated there. When any person was introduced he was delivered as a victim to the priests, who led him away to a place resounding...
Page 220 - Another decree connected with this was then made, on a motion of the consul, Quintus Marcius, that "the business respecting the persons who had served the consuls as informers should be proposed to the senate...
Page 217 - ... having offered his oath ought to be deemed sufficient evidence that those books should, without delay, be burned in the comitium, and that the owner should be paid for them such price as might be judged reasonable by the praetor Quintus Petillius, and the majority of the plebeian tribunes.
Page 217 - ... a proof of the truth of this, following generations could point to the statue of Claudia which the men of the time erected at the door of the temple of Cybele. Victor Duruy, commenting on the change wrought by these new divinities, says, "they gave a new cast to the religious convictions of people to whom a very crude form of worship had so long sufficed. Born in the scorching East, these deities required savage rites and pious orgies. Dramatic spectacles, intoxicating ceremonies, affected violently...
Page 220 - To the capital triumvirs the task was assigned to post watches in proper places of the city, and to use vigilance in preventing any meetings by night. In order likewise to guard against fires, five assistants were joined to the triumvirs, so that each might have the charge of the buildings in his own...
Page 218 - ... a priest of secret and nocturnal rites. These mysterious rites were, at first, imparted to a few, but afterwards communicated to great numbers, both men and women. To their religious performances were added the pleasures of wine and feasting, to allure a greater number of proselytes. When wine, lascivious discourse, night, and the intercourse of the sexes had extinguished every sentiment of modesty, then debaucheries of every kind began to be...

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