Principles of Strategy, with Historical Illustrations

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General Service Schools Press, 1921 - 367 pages
 

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Page 144 - ... forces upon points of collision ; that we must fail unless we can find some way of making our advantage an overmatch for his ; and that this can only be done by menacing him with superior forces at different points at the same time, so that we can safely attack one or both if he makes no change ; and if he weakens one to strengthen the other, forbear to attack the strengthened one, but seize and hold the weakened one, gaining so much.
Page 30 - This aspiration is directly antagonistic to the great universal laws which rule all life. /War is a biological necessity of the first importance, a regulative element in the life of mankind which cannot be dispensed with, since without it an unhealthy development will follow, which excludes every advancement of the race, and therefore all real civilization.
Page 144 - I state my general idea of this war to be that we have the greater numbers, and the enemy has the greater facility of concentrating forces upon points of collision; that we must fail unless we can find some way of making our advantage an overmatch for his; and that this can only be done by menacing him with superior forces at different points at the same time...
Page 30 - Public war is a state of armed hostility between sovereign nations or governments. It is a law and requisite of civilized existence that men live in political, continuous societies, forming organized units, called states or nations, whose constituents bear, enjoy, and suffer, advance and retrograde together, in peace and in war.
Page 10 - ... those who are present at the scene of action, who see the country, who see the enemy; who see the advantages that occasions offer, and who, like people embarked in the same ship, are sharers of the danger.
Page 257 - The men must be impressed with the fact that, having made a considerable advance under fire and having been checked, it is suicidal to turn back in daylight. If they can advance no farther, they must intrench and hold on until the fall of darkness or a favorable turn in...
Page 10 - ... should be entered; where magazines should be formed; how provisions should be conveyed by land and sea; and when it is proper to engage the enemy, .when to lie quiet.
Page 257 - At the first firing position the attack seeks to gain fire superiority. This may necessitate a steady, accurate fire for a long time. The object is to subdue the enemy's fire and keep it subdued so that the attacking troops may advance from this point to a favorable place near the enemy from which the charge may be made. Hence, in the advance by rushes, sufficient rifles must be kept constantly in action to keep down the enemy's fire; this determines the size of the fraction rushing.
Page 10 - That commanders should be counselled, chiefly, by persons of known talent ; by those who have made the art of war their particular study, and whose knowledge is derived from...
Page 5 - Read and reread the campaigns of Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, Gustavus Adolphus, Turenne, Eugene, and Frederick ; take them for your model, that is the only way of becoming a great captain, to obtain the secrets of the art of war.

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