The Life of Samuel F. B. Morse, LL. D.: Inventor of the Electro-magnetic Recording Telegraph

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D. Appleton, 1875 - 776 pages
 

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Page 462 - Surely there is no enchantment against Jacob, neither is there any divination against Israel: according to this time it shall be said of Jacob and of Israel, What hath God wrought...
Page 437 - There is a tide in the affairs of men, That, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune ; Omitted, all the voyage of their life Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Page 538 - Office a written description of the same, and of the manner and process of making, constructing, compounding, and using it, in such full, clear, concise, and exact terms as to enable any person skilled in the art or science to which it appertains, or with which it is most nearly connected, to make, construct, compound, and use the same...
Page 536 - Court, said : — •'It is very difficult to distinguish it from the specification of a patent for a principle, and this at first created in the minds of the Court much difficulty ; but after full consideration, we think that the plaintiff does not merely claim a principle, but a machine embodying a principle, and a very valuable one. We think the case must be considered as if the principle being well known, the plaintiff had first invented a mode of applying it...
Page 539 - ... the means he uses in a manner so full and exact that any one skilled in the science to which it appertains can, by using the means he specifies, without' any addition to, or subtraction from them, produce precisely the result he describes. And if this cannot be done by the means he describes, the patent is void...
Page 235 - In electricity he has made a remarkable discovery; you write two or three words on a paper; he takes it with him into a room, and turns a machine enclosed in a cylindrical case, at the top of which is an electrometer, a small fine pith ball; a wire connects with a similar cylinder and electrometer in a distant apartment; and his wife, by remarking the corresponding motions of the ball, writes down the words they indicate; from which it appears that he has formed an alphabet of motions. As the length...
Page 226 - If the presence of electricity can be made visible in any part of the circuit, I see no reason why intelligence may not be transmitted instantaneously by electricity.
Page 538 - Now the monopoly granted to the patentee is for one entire thing ; it is the exclusive right of making, using, and vending to others to be used, the improvement he has invented, and for which the patent is granted.
Page 540 - But the delay in entering it is not unreasonable. For the objectionable claim was sanctioned by the head of the office; it has been held to be valid by a circuit court, and differences of opinion in relation to it are found to exist among the justices of this court. Under such circumstances the patentee had a right to insist upon it, and not disclaim it until the highest court to which it could be carried had pronounced its judgment. The omission to disclaim, therefore, does not render the patent...
Page 538 - ... or spinning cotton must be so described, and so must the art of printing by the motive power of steam. And in all of these cases, it has always been held that the patent embraces nothing more than the improvement described and claimed as new, and that any one who afterwards discovered a method of accomplishing the same object, substantially and essentially differing from the one described, had a right to use it. Can there be any good reason why the art of printing at a distance, by means of the...

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