Famous racing men, by 'Thormanby'.

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Page 25 - There are some hereditary strokes of character, by which a family may be as clearly distinguished as by the blackest features of the human face. Charles the First lived and died a hypocrite. Charles the Second was a hypocrite of another sort, and should have died upon the same scaffold. At the distance of a century, we see their different characters happily revived, and blended in your Grace. Sullen and severe without religion...
Page 24 - The character of the reputed ancestors of some men, has made it possible for their descendants to be vicious in the extreme, without being degenerate. Those of your grace, for instance, left no distressing examples of virtue, even to their legitimate posterity ; and you may look back with pleasure to an illustrious pedigree, in which heraldry has not left a single good quality upon record to insult and upbraid you.
Page 24 - Bute found no resource of dependence or security in the proud, imposing superiority of Lord Chatham's abilities, the shrewd, inflexible judgment of Mr. Grenville, nor in the mild but determined integrity of Lord Rockingham.
Page 51 - Pavilion was full of guests ; the Steyne was crowded with all the rank and fashion from London during that week ; the best horses were brought from Newmarket and the North, to run at these races, on which immense sums were depending ; and the course was graced by the handsomest equipages. The
Page 35 - ... in it, besides this there is an abundance of grass and shade. It has been for thirty or forty years the resort of all our old jockeys, and is now occupied by the sporting portion of the Government. We had Lord Grey and his daughter, Duke and Duchess of Richmond, Lord and Lady Errol, Althorp, Graham, Uxbridge, Charles Grey, Duke of Grafton, Lichfield, and Stanley's brothers.
Page 35 - It passed off very well—racing all the morning, an excellent dinner, and whist and blind hookey in the evening. It was curious to see Stanley. Who would believe they beheld the orator and statesman, only second, if second, to Peel in the House of Commons, and on whom the destiny of the country perhaps depends? There he was, as if he had no thoughts but for the turf, full of the horses...
Page 36 - ... statesman, only second, if second, to Peel, in the House of Commons, and on whom the destiny of the country perhaps depends ? There he was, as if he had no thoughts but for the Turf, full of the horses, interest in the lottery, eager, blunt, noisy, good-humoured has meditans nugas et totus in illis : at night equally devoted to the play as if his fortune depended on it. Thus can a man relax, whose existence is devoted to great objects and serious thoughts.
Page 24 - ... been employed and dismissed. The advice of the ablest men in this country has been repeatedly called for and rejected; and when the royal displeasure has been signified to a minister, the marks of it have usually been proportioned to his abilities and integrity. The spirit of the favorite had some apparent influence upon every administration; and every set of ministers preserved an appearance of duration as long as they submitted to that influence.
Page 67 - He could scarcely have quitted the turf that day without a pang. He had become the lord paramount of that strange world, so difficult to sway, and which requires for its government both a stern resolve and a courtly breeding. He had them both ; and though the blackleg might quail before the awful scrutiny of his piercing eye, there never was a man so scrupulously polite to his inferiors as Lord George Bentinck. The turf too was not merely the scene of the triumphs of his stud and his betting-book....
Page 35 - Stanley kept house for the first, and probably (as the house is for sale) for the last time. It is a very agreeable place, with an odd sort of house built at different times and by different people ; but the outside is covered with ivy and creepers, which is pretty, and there are two good livingrooms in it. Besides this, there is an abundance of grass and shade ; it has been for thirty or forty years the resort of all our old jockeys, and is now occupied by the sporting portion of the Government.

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