Lord Byron's Strength: Romantic Writing and Commercial Society

Couverture
JHU Press, 1993 - 426 pages

According to Jerome Christensen, literary histories of British Romanticism have dealt inadequately with Byron's "lordship"—his singularity as a phenomenal literary success and as the last and greatest aristocratic poet in the language. At first, Byron does not want a poetic career. Then, entrapped by his extraordinary success, he gets one. And once Byron has a career, he ruins it—not by his unsavory sexual practices and political grandstanding, but by publishing his greatest poem. The first extended study of the career and persona of the most celebrated poet of the nineteenth century, Lord Byron's Strength draws on contemporary literary, political, and social theory not only to revise our understanding of Byron but also to reexamine the romanticism of Coleridge, Wordsworth, Scott, Hazlitt, and Shelley.

 

Table des matières

The Performance of Lordship
3
An English Bard Scotch Reviewers
32
Childe
49
The Moment
88
Childe Harold III and
142
Childe Harold IV
185
The Circumstantial Gravity of Don Juan
214
Marino Faliero and Sardanapalus
258
What Matters in
300
Notes
365
Index
419
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À propos de l'auteur (1993)

Jerome Christensen is chair of the English Department at the Univeristy of California, Irvine. He is also the author of Lord Byron's Strength: Romantic Writing and Commercial Society, also available from Johns Hopkins.

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