A Portion of the Journal Kept by Thomas Raikes, Esq., from 1831 to 1847, Volume 1

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Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1856
 

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Page 147 - ... the gratitude of her poor neighbours during her life, and the undisguised grief of all at her death. Whatever clouds (if indeed they ever existed) obscured the earlier part of her marriage, were in later times completely dispersed; and nothing could equal the respect and attention with...
Page 131 - ... affection, it became at last so oppressive, that they were obliged to send for their carriage and conduct her home. She was for a long time unwilling to say what was the cause of her indisposition ; but, on being more earnestly questioned, she at length confessed that she had, immediately on arriving in the concert room, been terrified by a horrible vision, which unceasingly presented itself to her sight. It seemed to her as though a naked corpse was lying on the floor at her feet; the features...
Page 280 - I met with Grey the other day, Who since he left the firm, Has travelled on his own account, And done, I fear, some harm ; So thought it right, where'er he went, To whisper round the ring, ' Perhaps you don't know how he lost The confidence of King.
Page 91 - Three or four of us were sitting round the fire, before we went up to dress for dinner ; amongst whom was the Duke, who amused us much with several anecdotes of the late king. He was in a very gay, communicative humour, and having seen so much of George IV., one story brought on another. He said that, among other peculiarities of the king, he had a most extraordinary talent for imitating the manner, gestures, and even voice of other people. So much so, that he could give you the exact idea of any...
Page 92 - the most extraordinary compound of talent, wit, buffoonery, obstinacy, and good feeling — in short, a medley of the most opposite qualities, with a great preponderance of good — that I ever saw in any character in my life.
Page 67 - They now wish for war, but of such a nature as would not render it necessary for them to go down to Parliament, and formally announce it to the country and demand supplies ; a war that might be carried on with their present maritime peace establishment: and he thinks that, if the Portuguese question was settled, and the fleet in the Tagus at liberty, they would have sufficient means to carry on their views of annoyance on Holland. With respect to the blockade of the Dutch ports, not only would it...
Page 49 - I do not think that in all my experience I ever remember such a season in London as this has been ; so little gaiety, so few dinners, balls, and fetes. The political dissensions have undermined society, and produced coolnesses between so many of the highest families ; and between even near relations, who have taken opposite views of the question. Independent of this feeling, the Tory party, — whose apprehensions for the future are most desponding, who think that a complete revolution is near at...
Page 91 - sat a little way from them, and next to Prince Frederick of Orange. The dinner passed off very well ; but, to the great astonishment of the company, both the king and queen, without any apparent cause, were at every moment breaking out in violent convulsions of laughter. There appeared to be no particular joke, but every remark our king made to his neighbours threw them into fits. Prince Frederick questioned me as to what could be going on. I shrewdly suspected what it might be, but said nothing...
Page 41 - D'Orsay *, very good looking, and grfted with great talents, the son of the General Count d'Orsay, whose mother married Mr. Crawford, well known for many years as a rich collector of pictures and articles of vertu at Paris. His sister, a beautiful person, married the Due de Guiche, son of the Due de Grammont, and is now, .with her husband, following the fortunes of the exiled royal family, at Holyrood House. Wednesday, 30th. — This day died Sir James Mackintosh, of a lingering disorder, originally...
Page 238 - ... by a constant and active pressure from without to the adoption of any measures the necessity of which has not been fully proved...

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